sql-server-2014

Articles about SQL Server 2014, In-Memory OLTP Database Engine, Windows Azure integration, AlwaysOn Availability Groups, business intellligence, data visualization tools, and more.

How to check consistency of your backups - CHECKSUM

Backups should always use WITH CHECKSUM:

BACKUP DATABASE [DatabaseName]
TO DISK = N'D:\Backups\DatabaseName.bak'
WITH INIT, CHECKSUM;
GO

Check in backup header (column IsDamaged) , if it contains a corrupted database (i.e. the database was already corrupted when the backup was performed):

RESTORE HEADERONLY
FROM DISK = N'D:\Backups\DatabaseName.bak';
GO

You can test the backup integrity:

RESTORE VERIFYONLY
FROM DISK = N'D:\Backups\DatabaseName.bak'
WITH CHECKSUM;
GO

Checking backup consistency is not an alternative to regular database consistency checking via DBCC CHECKDB.

Performance troubleshooting using Waits

WITH [Waits]
AS
(SELECT
        [wait_type],
        [wait_time_ms] / 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
        ([wait_time_ms] - [signal_wait_time_ms]) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
        [signal_wait_time_ms] / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
        [waiting_tasks_count] AS [WaitCount],
        100.0 * [wait_time_ms] / SUM ([wait_time_ms]) OVER() AS [Percentage],
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [wait_time_ms] DESC) AS [RowNum]
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats
WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',    N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP',
        N'RESOURCE_QUEUE',   N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH',
        N'SLEEP_TASK',       N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK',
        N'WAITFOR',          N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION',
        N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
        N'XE_TIMER_EVENT',   N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'LOGMGR_QUEUE',     N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT',
        N'BROKER_TASK_STOP', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT',
        N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT',   N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'TRACEWRITE',       N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT',
        N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH',  N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER',
        N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',  N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP',
        N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL')
)
SELECT TOP 10
        W1.[wait_type] AS [WaitType],
        CAST (W1.[WaitS] AS DECIMAL(14, 2)) AS [Wait (seconds)],
        CAST (W1.[ResourceS] AS DECIMAL(14, 2)) AS [Resource wait (seconds)],
        CAST (W1.[SignalS] AS DECIMAL(14, 2)) AS [Signal wait (seconds)],
        W1.[WaitCount],
        CAST (W1.[Percentage] AS DECIMAL(4, 2)) AS [Percentage],
        CAST ((W1.[WaitS] / W1.[WaitCount]) AS DECIMAL (14, 4)) AS [AvgWait (seconds)],
        CAST ((W1.[ResourceS] / W1.[WaitCount]) AS DECIMAL (14, 4)) AS [AvgResource (seconds)],
        CAST ((W1.[SignalS] / W1.[WaitCount]) AS DECIMAL (14, 4)) AS [AvgSignal (seconds)]
FROM
        [Waits] AS W1
        INNER JOIN [Waits] AS W2 ON W2.[RowNum] <= W1.[RowNum]
GROUP BY W1.[RowNum], W1.[wait_type], W1.[WaitS],
        W1.[ResourceS], W1.[SignalS], W1.[WaitCount], W1.[Percentage];
GO

Find out waiting tasks - sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks

sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks dmv shows all threads that are currently suspended:

SELECT
        DB_NAME(ER.database_id) DatabaseName,
        OT.[session_id],
        OT.[exec_context_id],
        OT.[wait_duration_ms],
        OT.[wait_type],
        OT.[blocking_session_id],
        OT.[resource_description],
        ES.[program_name],
        ST.[text],
        ES.[cpu_time],
        ES.[memory_usage],
        QP.[query_plan]
FROM
        sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks OT
        INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_sessions ES ON OT.[session_id] = ES.[session_id]
        INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_requests ER ON ES.[session_id] = ER.[session_id]
        OUTER APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text (ER.[sql_handle]) ST
        OUTER APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan (ER.[plan_handle]) QP
WHERE ES.[is_user_process] = 1
ORDER BY OT.[session_id], OT.[exec_context_id];
GO

How to clear wait statistics

You may need to clear the aggregated wait statistics (available via sys.dm_os_wait_statistics DMV) in order to measure the effect of a workload change against previous wait statistics.

This can be done at any time by running the below statement:

DBCC SQLPERF (N'sys.dm_os_wait_statistics', CLEAR)

How to get current recovery model for a database

Option 1:

SELECT
     name as [Database Name],
     recovery_model_desc as [Recovery Model]
FROM sys.databases
GO

Option 2:

SELECT DATABASEPROPERTYEX(N'<db name>', N'Recovery') as [Recovery Model];
GO

Performance statistics for stored procedures

By looking at the results returned by dm_exec_procedure_stats DMV, we can gather info about how a stored procedure is performing:

SELECT
        DB_NAME(database_id), p.name as SPName, execution_count
        , total_physical_reads, total_physical_reads / execution_count as avg_physical_reads
        , total_logical_reads, total_logical_reads / execution_count as avg_logical_reads
        , total_elapsed_time, total_elapsed_time / execution_count as avg_elapsed_time
        , QP.query_plan
FROM
        sys.procedures P
        JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats S ON S.object_id = P.object_id
        CROSS APPLY [sys].[dm_exec_query_plan] (S.[plan_handle]) QP
WHERE
        S.database_id = DB_ID()
        AND P.is_ms_shipped = 0

How to delete or invalidate a query plan

Reboot / Restart
When SQL Server is rebooted, or the service is stopped and restarted, any DMV data is lost.

Flushed Cache
The hard way, delete all query plans from cache:

-- Never execute this on your production server
DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

or you can target specific plans:
DBCC FREEPROCCACHE(plan_handle)

Memory pressures
Keeping a large number of cached plans can quickly fill the available memory, especially in systems that create lots of SQL queries that differ subtly (for example, having different environment settings), resulting in separate cached plans for each one.
SQL Server manages the size of the procedure cache by maintaining the age of the execution plans in the cache. If a stored procedure is not re-executed for a long time, the age field of the execution plan can come down to 0, and the plan can be removed from the cache when SQL Server observes a pressure on its memory.

Recompiling
Recompile all queries related to a specific table or view:

EXEC sp_recompile <tablename>

Delete all query plans associated with a stored procedure.

-- Manually mark a stored procedure for recompilation, so it will be recompiled next time it is executed.
EXEC sp_recompile <procname>

Or you can enforce a query recompilation each time, then add a query hint to the end of the query:

OPTION (RECOMPILE)

Add the WITH RECOMPILE option when a stored proc is created:

CREATE PROCEDURE <ProcedureName>
WITH RECOMPILE
AS
...

When statistics are updated
More details about when statistics change.

Simple parametrization
Setting configuration option optimize for ad hoc workloads to 1, will store only query_hash into the cache and and on second execution (if it happens), the plan itself will be placed in cache.

Forced parametrization
Parametrize all queries like in case of simple parametrization

ALTER DATABASE <dbname> SET PARAMETRIZATION FORCED;

When statistics really change?

Stats change:

  • When a table with no rows gets a row
  • When a table has fewer than 500 rows and is increased by 500 or more rows
  • Through SQL Server's auto-updating mechanism based on database option AUTO_UPDATE_STATISTICS (which by default is enabled and it performs synchronously), statistics get automatically changed when 500 + 20% of the table rows change. E.g. for a table with 100k rows, stats will get invalidated when 20500 rows are updated. Read more about this.
  • In addition to statistics on indexes, SQL Server can build statistics on columns with no indexes. See AUTO_CREATE_STATISTICS option.
  • If trace flag 2371 is turned on, then updates are dynamic Read more about this.
  • When you rebuild an index (equivalent to FULLSCAN).
  • Or you can decide to manually update the statistics.

Get statistics info about an index

DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS returns info about 3 components:
- header
- density vector
- histogram = is a statistical construct that shows how often data falls into varying categories. The histogram stored by SQL Server consists of a sampling of data distribution for a column or an index key of up to 200 rows.

DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS('<tablename>', '<indexname>');

You can limit the statistics information displayed by using WITH HISTOGRAM clause:

DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS('<tablename>', '<indexname>')
WITH HISTOGRAM;

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